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Successful Entrepreneurial Journey with Founder of Harness Wealth

Founded in Tech Episode 11

Join host Dave Garvey as he talks with David Snider, Founder and CEO at Harness Wealth where he is building a gateway to “Next Gen” wealth management services. David will be discussing his journey and exciting career transitions, and how those experiences have made him successful in his current entrepreneurial role.

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Dave Garvey:
Welcome to this episode of founded in tech, brought to you by Withum and your host today, Dave Garvey and today’s episode, I am joined by David Snider, founder and CEO at Harness Wealth, where we will learn more about his interesting path that began in consulting and investing to leading finance and operations at a New York unicorn that recently had their IPO and the present day where he is founder and CEO of his own venture backed company, and huge congrats on the closing of their $15 million series A as we talk with David, we will learn more about his journey and everything he has learned since starting Harness Wealth. All right, so today is going to be informative and with that a warm welcome to our guest, David Snider. Thanks for joining us today.

David Snider:
My pleasure. Good to be here Dave.

Dave Garvey:
Real good to have you here David. So, uh, before we get into your interesting journey, uh, can you tell everybody a little bit about Harness Wealth?

David Snider:
My pleasure. So harness is building the gateway to next-generation wealth services, but doing it through a tax driven and multi vertical approach. And so what that means is we want to be the single gateway that people use to understand what they should be doing, how and who they should be doing it with and through our platform to have everything in one place with a big and unique focus on tax as part of that.

Dave Garvey:
Excellent. Good. I do think it is important that we actually go back to Harness Wealth because you’ve learned a lot just being focused on this particular domain. But before we do that, let’s kind of go back to the early days, right? So, you know, you went through school and you came out and joined one of the, you know, the preeminent consulting firms and later ended up similarly, a top tier private equity firm. What can you tell us about what brought you there and maybe what you learned there that has helped to prepare you for who you are today and what you’re building today?

David Snider:
Absolutely. So I was fortunate to have some great mentors during college. And one in particular who’d actually been at McKinsey versus Bane sort of said, there’s no better place to begin understanding business than in consulting because you get to understand the challenges of lots of different businesses in short order. And most likely that’s not going to be where you spend your entire career, but it’s a really unique place to learn how to analyze. And it’s a broader picture on sort of the business ecosystem. And I found that to be true in spades. That being said kind of early on, I really wanted to try my hand in investing and the opportunity to join Bain capital on the private equity side came along, felt like they were a firm that knew what to do with a consultant versus a banker, which is where the traditional private equity firm, path sort of began and made that move back in 2009.

Speaker 3:
Uh, incidentally obviously after getting the offer in sort of the best of private equity times, the financial services market collapsed. Luckily my offer sort of stood the test of those very strong wins, but it was a slightly different experience out of the gate. You know, perhaps in people they might have expected, but ultimately a really positive one, given that the market was coming back, as I joined and got to see the process of taking a company public on the New York stock exchange. Working through a pre-packaged bankruptcy, buying some other assets and it ended up being a very rich experience.

Dave Garvey:
Yep. The good old days, the pre-packs right. And so, uh, that was all informative in terms of how it prepared you for some of what you did today, but you ended up at Compass, right. You know, which is, you know, a company early on that you joined to be the first real finance and ops hire to lead the building of that. And so didn’t know that it would become what it is today and which is now a public company after raising a lot of money and doing what it could to, you know, disrupt a lot of the traditional residential real estate brokerage domain. And so, you know, you join there after having done consulting, investing. What, what is that, what does that like and what, what brought you there?

David Snider:
Well, I think as a transition, one of the key things to highlight is that there are two core components to being able to make material career transitions, which ultimately is what I did. I mean, it was through business school, but going from being an associate in a private equity firm to the originally head of finance and operations, and shortly thereafter, I had a CFO, COO. Reliving comes down to two things, one telling a good story in the sense that I had to convince the founders and some of the other folks that were there. I mean, I joined as the 10th employee, but there was a team that proceeded me at Compass that I could do it. And I had done a number of real estate transactions at Bain capital. They happen to be on the commercial side, not a ton of relevance, but I think being able to articulate the relevance of what you’ve done to the challenge that you need to do is a really important skill that people should think about.

David Snider:
The second is just building a process for learning. So part of the pitch that I made and even put together some slides to convince the founders of this was articulating a process by which I learned. Hey, I don’t have all the answers, but here are the people that I know that I will draw from. And asking about how do you think about insurance for a small business and you know, where do I go to make the first hire and what should be internal versus outsourced, et cetera. And that was all sort of critical in the transition and figuring out in an environment where none of us had all the answers, you know, how to help sustain a business when you’re growing by leaps and bounds every quarter and every year.

Dave Garvey:
Yeah, for sure. And thanks for sharing. I mean, that was important to share. I appreciate you mentioning that, you know, even with those incredible experiences professionally, you still had to hustle to convince the folks at Compass that you would be, you know, a smart, the right decision for them to bring on board. And so, you know, not everybody understands that even if you’ve done these remarkable things in your career, it’s still involves sometimes we have to go out of our comfort zone and still be a beginner and be teachable and let people know, Hey, I don’t know everything, but you know, I’ve proven X, Y, and Z in the past, and I’ve been able to overcome these sorts of challenges and what have you. So you put in your time there, which, you know, which was a long time.

Dave Garvey:
And, you know, at some point you decided it was time for something different, right. You know, you had the very cool opportunity you want, you know, you went back to being capital this time, the VC part of it, paying capital at the PE group. And as an EIR, entrepreneur in residence. And so which, you know, a very sort of exclusive and smart way to be able to process different opportunities, test them, explore what could be your own venture, which today is what led to Harness Wealth. And so tell us what that was like to now go back and to leave Compass first of all, and then to go and essentially be an EIR embarking upon your own entrepreneurial process.

David Snider:
Absolutely. Yeah. So I’d been at compass for about five years, had raised all the company’s capital sort of from series A to series E and felt like there were new challenges, but sort of the scope was only getting narrow, which is what has to happen as a company goes from, you know, 2 billion to hopefully 10 or 20 billion. I had a boss and was really excited by the theme that we had stumbled into really inadvertently with Compass, which was the power of tech enablement of advisory services. We had started with a hypothesis that if we just built better technology and figured out how to take customer service, hospitality themes, and apply to real estate, that would be the silver bullet. And what we found was that people did want better UI, UX experiences, data insights, mobile enablement, but they wanted it back with the advice of people who had done a hundred or 200 transactions like the home they were looking to buy or to sell or something else. And so that really was the key insight that has driven the growth of compass was partnering with top core tile, real estate agents and applying a better set of technology and services to help them serve their clients more effectively. And that theme I thought was super interesting, still somewhat nascent. So when I got to Bing, it was very much focused on what’s the right application of that and looked at a few spaces, but became fascinated by both the similarities and the scope of opportunity that I saw in the wealth management and tax space.

Dave Garvey:
Sure. So leading onto that. So now you’re an entrepreneur and you’re now on that journey, right? Which is not the typical path for folks with your background to take, but in some ways the journey started a few years before that, or the seeds were planted. I mean, and not everybody would think of this as an entrepreneurial experience, but you wrote your own book and, you know, you authored a book which is not common for folks to do, and especially maybe earlier in their career. And so tell us a little bit about that. It’s an awesome read. And, I just, I think it’s important to share with folks what actually has to go into that and what it actually has done for you.

David Snider:
Yeah. Well, I think there’s some interesting similarities actually, in there, the decision to write the book and to start Harness, because I’ve never been someone who felt like, Hey, I could never work for a boss, or I need to, you know, do my own thing, or it has to be a startup. Both this company and that project came out of a desire to when I saw something that I wanted or thought should exist as a resource and couldn’t find it. It was like, well, if it ought to exist, then like who better than me, I guess, to take a shot at doing that. And so the Genesis of moneymakers was I worked on Capitol hill where I thought was going to be sort of the trajectory for me professionally. Loved the experience, but sort of felt like too much was out of your control in terms of which party was in power.

David Snider:
And, you know, whether the member of Congress you worked for behaved appropriately and all sorts of other things. And so I started, I do want to go into business, but don’t really know what that means or what that should look like. And as I mentioned, I was fortunate to have a couple of great mentors. Sort of spoke with them and realize, you know, there are all these other fields that I want to understand and started finding ways to reach out to people and had a bunch of conversations. And at the time stepped back and said, you know, there are a lot of peers of mine at Duke and other places that have a similar interest in these areas. Don’t understand what drives them, the differences, et cetera. Wouldn’t it be cool if I was able to put together a book and, oh, by the way, not the worst Trojan horse excuse to talk to people who you may want to work for then saying, Hey, not give me a job, but I’m writing this book would love to interview you.

David Snider:
Um, and oh, by the way, sort of getting on the radar of people that I might and ultimately did end up working for in a few cases. And so that was the Genesis of the book. And ultimately it was very similar with Harness Wealth where I got back to being capital and was open to maybe I find some amazing business that exists, that I want to get Bain to invest in. And for me to become, you know, an operating executive within, when I sort of saw this opportunity that I felt like was the confluence of some macro trends, big opportunity aligned with at least the thematically, what I had done before with Compass in supporting great advisors and building technology to enhance the client experience. It just felt like I would be crazy not to take a run at it.

Dave Garvey:
Sure. Good. Well, thanks for sharing about that. I think that’s something that we come across folks along the way that just have a strong point of view on a particular domain or what have you. And, you know, these days we see people write blog posts and that sort, or even have podcasts, that sort of thing. But, you know, for folks to actually be able to assemble everything that would go into a book is, is quite a feat. So definitely a hat tip to you for that. And so you’re building Harness now, right?

David Snider:
Then on another book thing Dave to those that are listening, I probably would’ve made more money bartending on an, on a per hour basis relative to writing a book. But I think the calling card of having done it was actually pretty important and convincing the admissions committee in business school that I wasn’t just one of many others that had done professional services, that there was sort of a unique angle there and convincing that one of the co-founders at Compass that I had sort of that entrepreneurial drive before I had the professional experiences to prove it out. So certainly don’t regret it and pretty cool to have it on the bookshelf, but, uh, people should know what they’re signing up for if they start pursuing that, whether or not they ultimately decided to publish.

Dave Garvey:
Sure. Well, and it’s definitely the intangibles. In fact, I think these days, anybody that sets out to maybe do something like that should probably have a few things that they’d like to accomplish with it. Right. Good to see that it definitely worked out for you in such a way. So, so with Harness, right, like it’s the early days like, and I don’t mean today. I mean, you know, you’re still at Bain and you’ve, you’re launching this, you’re testing things. You’re starting to collect some resources and figure out how to allocate. What’s important to tell people about, especially with your background, what it’s like now to be actually launching your own company which is a venture backed company with everything that comes with that.

David Snider:
The most important thing that I sort of felt was the emotional highs and lows. So I’d been in a high pressure environment in private equity. I had been in sort of a high pressure environment of raising capital that was going to be critical to the company, sort of making it to the next stage at Compass. But there really is nothing quite like the founding entrepreneurial experience, both in terms of how excited and related you can be when you feel like you’ve uncovered this nugget of market insight, that there may be something there to build a business, or at least even consider building a feature that is unique. Um, and also you have the opposite of that, that when something doesn’t go right, or you think you have an insight and find a business doing that or something else, you know, sort of how low it can bring you in and as sort of like sharp the intellectual pain, you know, uh, of your insight being targeted or muted to some degree.

David Snider:
So I think that was the biggest adjustment that it’s no different in terms of the stress level of other things, but it makes shifts differently, and ends up being a little bit more extreme in some ways. You know, as I mentioned, I was keeping an open mind for several months of joining something versus building. And, you know, you do hit this inflection point of excitement about an idea that you sort of say, if I haven’t come off, what was then, and is still today a successful entrepreneurial experience at a senior level? I don’t think the shot now, like when are you going to do it? I think people often put too much weight on the risk factor. I think the U.S. In general now with like the tech market, the way it is. Lots of folks that I know that have done things didn’t work out, moved on to something equally compelling, if not better.

David Snider:
And so I think it’s, it’s always worth taking the shot. If you feel like there’s a pathway and you have sort of milestones in mind that may not be worth spending, you know, five years unpaid working on something, if you don’t have the resources to do it, but taking sort of controlled risk in terms of, Hey, I’m comfortable spending X amount of time at whatever compensation rate or whatever sort of milestones to do it. And so was it ultimately that risky, at least as I thought about in, in sort of taking the leap, um, from where I was standing. And I, I do think though that you have to have, uh, a certain minimum threshold of enthusiasm and that there were some cool ideas that I came across that I was like, there is this huge opportunity in XYZ, but you know, what debt care and the funeral business, not really where I want to spend sort of five years of my life focused on, even if it could be really successful. And there were some businesses that were recruiting me that I, that have proved to be super successful. They already were beforehand, but it’s like, I can’t get excited about what I’m doing. It’s going to be a challenge to deliver sort of your best work and be excited to live and breathe this, which I think you need to do both at the senior level of running a company, or certainly at that, you know, in the founding C.

Dave Garvey:
Yeah. You reminded me of that book, the Monk and the Riddle, which was back in the.com days. It was about someone at a, an inflection point. And, uh, I think it was about whether they should start with, I think it was funerals.com, right? And so it was a, it was a very interesting story about like how to assess whether these are opportunities worth pursuing or not, you know, good point on how to assess the risk. And maybe it’s not always as risky as it seems. This is launching Harness Wealth. You very quickly get to a point where you’re like, you decide, you know, you realize you need other people involved. Right. And so, you know, so now it’s a matter of, you know, other folks need to assess the risk right. Of joining this. And so, you know, can you tell us about, you know, how you went about just scaling that team, how you prioritize certain activities early on, and basically, you know, someone with your background to, to build what essentially is a technology platform.

David Snider:
Yeah. So, um, I think the ability to convince someone to leave a good job or a good opportunity, and join with you as a nice litmus test on, you know, how well you’ve thought through the idea and how compelling you are as a storyteller in doing it. I mean, ultimately as a founder, there are two constituencies you need to be able to convince of things and the story ought to be similar, but it can be a slightly different set of flavors. One is investors, unless you’re independently financing a business. And in two ways really talented people to build it, because with those two things even kind of do anything and missing one of the two, you know, you essentially can’t do anything. I was fortunate that I think the first three or four hires all were referrals from people that I, I knew my co-founder Katie actually was a close business school friend of a colleague of my wife’s, who, when they heard about kind of what I was pursuing connected, the two of us, and we really aligned on vision.

David Snider:
Katie had come from financial services, honestly in a more direct way as it relates to this business, then I had shaped the time was the COO of Nutmeg, the largest rebel advisor in Europe. She had run American Express’s centurions with ultra high end consumer card and saw the same opportunity as I articulated it, but from a different side, and then a number of technical hires that came from other entrepreneur friends, and some of those people that introduced us to, you know, other folks. And, um, it was a great starting point, both in terms of validation. And in terms of, you know, getting people on board early that you had some close touch point to and in recruiter fee for to get things rolling. And then from there, obviously you start to stay on with traditional combinations recruiters and some of the hiring platforms and everything you can do to get in front of great talent, especially when you’re a non known entity, uh, and recruiting

Dave Garvey:
For sure. Well, so, and the other thing is also just the, you know, there’s, you know, you don’t have a technical background, right? So you’re building this technology platform. You’re assembling the team for that. You know, we see a wide variety of founders these days, starting companies and, uh, you know, a lot of them though have that technical background. And so, you know, could you share a little bit just about what some of the advantages are, and maybe even the disadvantages to, you know, someone with your kind of background starting a company versus, you know, a software developer or a PhD, or what have you.

David Snider:
So I think there are different types of businesses. There are some that are explicitly driven through a really unique technology breakthrough, where it’s coming out of translational research or of some other highly complex area that, you know you need to have very deep technical expertise even to validate that it’s a business worth pursuing. For all businesses. there is an inflection point where you need a great business oriented person, whether they’re a founder or not, in terms of the capital raising distribution, scaling, et cetera, et cetera. With Harness, I think there were two things that were helpful. One, a lot of similarities to the success of compass in terms of partnering with existing advisors, needing to understand existing workflows, current third-party technology, different consumer tools, and sort of figure out how to thread together a number of pieces where part of the value was in the sum of the parts coming together more effectively through technology to unlock unique value that couldn’t otherwise be the case.

David Snider:
And so it wasn’t a need for just one core piece of technology, but for a very multifaceted set of things. And so out of the gate, I felt like the two most important components were sort of a go to market expertise within consumer FinTech that Katie had and a really honed product development, product management skillset in terms of understanding the product market fit as well as obviously the technical side of building. And so, you know, very early on, I think that, you know, the third hire was a full stack engineer who sort of grown up in financial services, but it wasn’t critical day one to have an experienced CTO head of engineering in order to go through some of those early validations, that there was a business that was, you know, financeable from a VC perspective and where we could actually validate that there was a market need as we got going.

Dave Garvey:
Well. So adding, you know, you’re working through that and you’re building, you’re obviously overcoming certain challenges, everything, you know, rolling with the punches, as they say, which is inherent in any startup situation, you know, but you clearly demonstrated a, you know, a wide variety of leadership capabilities, right? And so when it comes to someone like you, who’s now CEO and founder of a company, and, you know, you’ve got your board and other investor relations, what’s important to you. And maybe what’s important to share to folks as they’re trying to learn through this, especially since, you know, someone like you has been on both sides of the table.

David Snider:
Yep. I’ve served become a professional fundraiser in the sense that I’ve raised nine rounds of capital the last eight years and across Compass and Harness, it’s really valuable to build relationships outside of active fundraising conversations. And I was fortunate at Compass that I built relationships with investors. So I’m home invested and got district to see me as an operator. And, uh, through that lens, others never invested capital, but developed a relationship. And they then either invested in harness or they liked me enough that we stay in contact and they made introductions to other investors, et cetera. And so figuring out how to create a positive network in the ecosystem, and often, you know, you’re going back and forth where I was, you know, at Bain, ostensibly as like a little bit investor operator, et cetera. Now just purely sort of operator. It’s a very intertwined ecosystem.

David Snider:
And so figuring out how, when you don’t need capital today to build relationships is really important to do. And then for those that, that do invest trying to figure out a cadence of communication and expectation settings that doesn’t consume a hundred percent of your time on IRR, but allows people to feel invested in what they’re doing. So, you know, fairly early on at compass started doing these annual investor meetings. We included even the small angel investors where a lot of companies are start to say, Hey, we’re only focused on the largest institutional folks. And often it was those individual investors that made the most valuable introductions in terms of BD or something else. And so the broader, the ecosystem of people you can foster take care about you is I think the more dividends that can ultimately pay.

Dave Garvey:
Yeah, for sure. So, well, I mean, part of that too is just having the right information at your command, right? So that you’re properly prepared in these different settings and interactions. You know, it’s always important to touch on just data and that domain that involves KPIs and metrics and that sort of thing, you know, it’s really with it, you know, when we get granular, that’s where we really can unlock some of the insights that do make a difference. And so, you know, what have you done to, to be able to see the data that is important to you? Um, what you’ve, you know, you’ve built to have it in a format that is properly actionable for you and has allowed you to align other folks to the strategy that, you know, that data helps to inform

David Snider:
To be a little controversial. I think both in early days of Compass and in Harness, we over-invested in some way. And we wanted to have the TV screen in the office with a bunch of metrics and real time stuff. And, you know, some engineer or two engineers, you know, spend a bunch of time figuring out how to create that, et cetera. And in both cases, I don’t know that there was a single insight that had a major business difference from that, TV screen, et cetera. So it is very easy, I think to believe that real time data and visibility is in and of itself, a good, that is going to translate into business value. That being said, without having measurement of the things that really drive the business, and in generally there are two different sets of data. One is data that a high level tells you whether you’re actually making progress, you know, are we met adding clients?

David Snider:
Are we met seeing incremental usage of technology by clients, et cetera. And then separately there’s do we have enough data that if some of those things at a headline value is not trending where we expect that we can figure out like what the heck is going on? And those are separate things. It can be that you’re pulling the data from the same place. It’s all organized in some way, shape or form. But I think often there’s a desire to make all of the underlying inputs real time and visible. And you end up over-investing in data analysis where what you need is the ability to access historically information to problem solve, draw insights, and make decisions, which often is separate from a data set that tells you, Hey, are we making progress to validate that we’re just broadly heading in the right direction?

Dave Garvey:
For sure. Yeah. Well, especially like when it’s, there’s a certain periods, especially in the early days where a lot of that data doesn’t even have much of a shelf life to it. Right. And so why, why overbuild over and fast to only have something that, you know, is not going to let you know, provide the ROI which was intended definitely a point well-taken on that, for sure. All right. So I like to switch over to the human side of things, especially a guy like you well-suited for that. So you’ve obviously accomplished a lot, you know, you could say it’s early days in your career, you’ve got a very fruitful road ahead of, what is it that you would still actually like to do, you know, and it could be professional or personal, but anything that you would like to share that would be pretty cool for us to know.

David Snider:
I mean, I’ve been very fortunate to have great opportunities, both from, you know, big companies making offers for me to join and really learn more from them, then, you know, the value I feel like I contributed in some ways. Compass, you know, has been a great success. I feel very fortunate to have been part of that journey, but there definitely is something unique of your own business where you sort of had an idea or an inclination about a market and then convince people to join and convince people to provide you with capital, et cetera. And so there’s a unique burden that I feel every day to both of those constituencies. I think, you know, certainly to some degree the investors, because, you know, the capital is real. In some cases it’s personal capital, in some cases it’s institutional, but I probably feel a, a heavier burden just to the people that have chosen to spend at least a chapter of their career believing in me and the vision building something.

David Snider:
And so most of the work I shouldn’t say, you know, is yet to come with making a Harness, even a fraction of the success that I think it can be given the market opportunity that we have the quality of the team and investors that we’ve assembled to date. So I’m happy with the opportunities that I’ve had. I feel grateful for those that have provided them to me and hopefully haven’t disappointed anyone. Uh, they gave me those shots along the way, but this is definitely, you know, both the biggest opportunity and the biggest challenge. And so I think there’s a long road ahead because the opportunity is so big here. And so it’s hard to think, you know, much further past that and just feel like I’ve got an unbelievable opportunity that I want to feel like I gave, uh, the best shot at pursuing in the hardest and most thoughtful way.

Dave Garvey:
Definitely. All right. Cool. Well, I mean, so you’ve not just that, but you’ve shared a lot about just your lessons and it’s all been valuable to pass along to the audience. So if we could go back to Harness now and just to, you know, you’ve been focused on this domain now for a few years, right. And it’s the domain of wealth management, right? Which, you know, for some people, you know, uh, it’s still a little bit obscure for some people it’s maybe boring, but it’s needed and, you know, for others, they’re always trying to maybe figure out how to do better themselves. Right. You know, what can you tell folks, you know, whether it’s, uh, wisdom that you’ve acquired just from being so deep in this domain, you know, maybe even warnings to pass along to people, but you know, what do you think is most important to share with folks as they think about wealth management?

David Snider:
Yes. I’d say part of the Genesis of the business was the fact that despite, you know, this quote unquote great pedigree that should make be the perfect person to manage my own finances, CFO, and, you know, investor from a fancy place and business school at Harvard et cetera. Every six to nine months, Dave, I fear about finding something that I wasn’t doing right. And this isn’t like, oh, I missed the opportunity to buy some stock. It was like, we don’t know unequivocally, you should do this thing differently with your early company stock or unequivocally you should have, if you have a balanced portfolio, different assets in tax deferred retirement accounts, then your personal account. You know, unequivocally, you should have a basic will healthcare practice and estate planning stuff done. And so I stepped back and said, gosh, if someone like me, who’s got the benefit of great training and likes this stuff, you know, has so many dollars sort of left on the floor.

David Snider:
There’s gotta be this massive opportunity in helping all sorts of other folks that have been focused on their professional careers, successful in making some money along the way to make sure that they are capturing the things that those with absurd amounts of wealth creation, you know, have a family office team creating. So the Genesis of partners was how can we take the themes of making sure that all this stuff you should do. You’re aware of helping to consolidate your full financial picture in one place, indivi the ability to like analyze key decisions around equity, liquidity events, and understanding your, the taxation on your investments and other stuff that really drive pretty big differences in outcomes, and pairing all of that digital data insight, usability with a network of the best advisors throughout the country. Which in the segment of people with 1 million, 10, 20 million, it’s not the people at the biggest firms, it’s people at, you know, midsize firms, smaller firms, et cetera, that often have, you know, the best expertise.

David Snider:
And so, a advisor’s not always the solution when it is the advisor from the biggest brand you’ve heard of is often not the right solution. And so figuring out how to help people navigate that, we just think is extraordinarily valuable. Um, and also obviously, you know, complex because they’re trying to do a lot out of the gate in helping people with taxes, financial advisory, trust and estate over time to other areas as well. And while we’re doing that and build the best technology actually, to manage your finances as an individual, because that’s the piece that sort of pulls all of these components together.

Dave Garvey:
Definitely well, you’ve, you know, you’ve described my experience and, you know, certainly, you know, as you know, we have peers, we talk about these things on a, on a fairly routine basis. Right. And there’s just, there’s too much to know. And like you said, the folks that we think that should be good for it, you know, maybe they are, but it’s for, you know, a very different part of the stratosphere, right? And so it’s the folks that are there booking businesses, focused on folks that, you know, are aligned with what, the market that Harness Wealth is addressing. And so that’s a, that’s a great place to wrap this up. Definitely. David, appreciate you taking the time to be with us today. I know we’re excited to continue watching your success, and I definitely look forward to keeping in touch and want to thank you again for being with us today.

David Snider:
My pleasure. Great. Thanks David.

Dave Garvey:
Just for, uh, thanks again to all of our guests and our audience. We are definitely as always committed to creating content that brings value to you. Please feel free to reach out to me directly if you have ideas for future episodes or if you’d like to be a guest on this podcast. In the meantime, please enjoy and be well.

Thank you for tuning in. If you liked it, once you hear more, you can follow us and subscribe and we’ll see you next time on founded in tech.

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